Maine is the way life should be. Get here as soon as you can.

Not A Revenue Problem, It’s A Spending Habit Foreign To Living In Maine.

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Small Maine Towns Are Connected, Help Each Other. Not Every Man For Himself Crime Riddled.

The Essentials For A Healthy, Happy Life Taught In A Maine Home, Household Growing Up In Rural Vacationland, The Pine Tree State.

Maine is not an affluent state money wise but rich, bank rolled heavily in natural beauty treasures.

Loaded to the gills with outdoor no cost, low expense recreational options all four seasons. Turn on the tube, twist on the radio, thumb through the national newspapers. Lots of hub bub, wall to wall discussion, opinion on over the spending / deficit coming around full circle. Home to roost. Not a revenue problem, but a spending issue grasshopper.

In Maine, no one sees it as a big surprise or is “chicken little sky is falling” terrified.

Because when you make less money living in Maine, you get less dependent on it. And are brought up to save. Have better spending impulse control. To live below your means a tad all the time. To be more creative and resilient in your own skills to survive.

Because “if it is to be it is up to me thinking” adopted. Mainers are pretty independent and not so cranked up about asking for help. Because lots of folks way way worse off need it. But working hard to control every day spending, expenditures in a Maine home is the sport. Savings are the comfort, safety ring to sleep better nights. To get through a rough patch. To endure a spell of rainy days for that Maine household.

In Maine, it could always be worse thinking kicks in to pilot our thought stream. Just the way we are raised. Grateful for what we have in a Maine household. Not whining or kicking, shouting. Melting down about what we want right now or else tantrums with plenty of wall to wall drama kicked in. Not allowed in our Maine households raising kids. The galloping gimmees are talked about, discussed.

Flushed out growing up in Maine with kids around the supper table.

Comes up in conversations early on climbing and hiking up hills. Or discussed while chit chatting riding up a Maine ski lift. To point the boards down those Maine mountains we are blessed with and so easy to access. Building in, hard wiring every Maine kid with a full complement of life skills. To pass on what we were taught by loved ones for long long after they depart and leave the Earth.

I’d like to think most true Mainers would describe themselves as fiscally conservative but socially liberal. Open minded and fair but living within our means at the same time. Knowing no free lunch. Having the resources, privilege to learn how to fish. Rather than expecting someone to just provide the fish as a given, a right. And with the ability to keep an open mind, avoid judgemental narrow, snarky attitudes. And growing, expanding, maturing along the life path to be considerate on other points of view different than our own.

There was a time not so long ago where ninety six percent of this country were rural, farmers, self sufficient.

Food is right up there with air, water, love and family as some kind of important. Three generations growing up under one agricultural providing home roof. Out of necessity and family was an institution to cherish, preserve at all costs. Because we needed, enjoyed each other. On most days.

Now the flip flop is eight out of ten folks are in urban, city sprawling areas of high rises, housing projects. You can not step out back from the little house on the prairie. Like Maine’s lower population density and 4th lowest crime statistic allows.

To work the rich, fertile Maine farm soil. To plant the seeds, cultivate and grow your own table food. Or raise your own household meat. Or make the rounds daily to milk the family cow. Gather the local often double yolk fresh, growth hormone free, cageless eggs from your own laying hens. Or head to the wood lot to chop down, cut up the winter’s total source of heat. Not relying on foreign oil to keep your toes from freezing during a Maine winter.

I am so glad, happy my family was raised in a neat state like Maine.

And worry about those who were not. Stuck in cities with growing concern about what happens if, when the money runs out. How do we eat, create the shelter that is house hold safe for our kids? Without needing an AK 47 or AR 15 assault rifle to persuade, provide for your family the bare essentials by hook or by crook in an over crowded, scared city landscape. Lost in a sea of unknown sober long faces.

If things get bleak, the going gets tough. And the escape route from the city to Maine, rural states like it becomes necessary. Maine, meet you there. Every day I hear from out of state real estate buyers who don’t feel safe. Live in fear and are concerned what if? And who want to not go to the extreme of living off grid and be a Grizzly Adams Mountain Man.

Or that are thinking they’ll try to pay their property taxes with a bushel of carrots, barrel of potatoes. Or run away from the world home schooling, home everything and hide out in Maine. But just looking to simplify. To settle into a sane pace again for a quality of life. To catch their breath for the basics in living without the stress, fear, anxiety that takes it toll. And to escape all the people that invade their personal space on a round the clock basis where they live now.

Maine, not for everyone. But loaded with all you really need to get through this game called life. Being pretty well provided for, with all the essential ingredients to enjoy yourself along the way. Have you been to Maine yet? Considering moving, relocation, living in Maine full time? Buying a Maine home, some real estate like recreational land? I like how you think! Can help with the dream.

I’m Maine REALTOR Andrew Mooers, ME Broker
207.532.6573
info@mooersrealty.com

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